National Salute to Hospitalized Veterans Week

February 16, 2011 at 12:07 pm | Posted in Veteran Support | Leave a comment
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Angels Vern, Erin, Jill, Debbie, Melissa, Charlotte, and families had the honor of visiting with Veterans at the Puget Sound VA (seattle)  for the National Salute to Hospitalized Veterans festivities!  Thank you angels.

“The 30 bears we handed out were a huge success.”  (these are our Grratitude bears you can make too-ask us about them!)

“leaving them was probably one of the hardest things I done in a while……One guy I talked to gave me a big hug and was asking me to come back and visit again…..What will it take to be able to go and visit them again soon?
This was a great weekend. ”

I was told by one of the ladies that I had an angelic smile 🙂 And then again by one of the patients that I had helped with opening up his gum. He had said I had such a smile that no wonder I was an angel. Sure made my day. He has been in my mind since then.”

“And the vets? Oh my! Everyone was so gracious and thankful. It was so good I have decided to begin my weekly visits… I was humbled and thankful.”

Showing the love, respect and gratitude! Thanks angels and THANK YOU VETERANS!!

Thanks also to our Angel Crew for providing a Valentine’s visit to our American Lake Veterans. If you’d like to visit at a VA nearest you with Soldiers’ Angels email soldiersangelswashington @gmail.com or contact your local VA voluntary Services.

BALLOON RELEASE Honor and Remember……

July 5, 2010 at 6:51 pm | Posted in General Troop Support, Veteran Support | Leave a comment
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Soldiers’ Angels is honored to be a part of this event to honor and remember our fallen heroes from the 5-2 Stryker Brigade.  Balloon Release

The Memorial is on July 17th at Pioneer Park in Steilacoom. Arrive by 10am, launch at 11am sharp. Balloons/paper notes/pens provided. But you can bring your own if you want. You don’t want to miss this special event. It is open to all who would like to honor someone they have lost.  POC for the event is Lisa Palmer > See event listing http://www.facebook.com/event.php?eid=120455651332648&ref=mf

NATIONAL MEDAL OF HONOR DAY MARCH 25 2009th

March 25, 2009 at 2:25 pm | Posted in Uncategorized | 1 Comment
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Found this on One Marine’s View

NATIONAL MEDAL OF HONOR DAY   MARCH 25, 2009 

MOH2 

The Medal of Honor

The Medal of Honor is the highest award for valor in action against an enemy force which can be bestowed upon an individual serving in the Armed Services of the United States. Generally presented to its recipient by the President of the United States of America in the name of Congress, it is often called the Congressional Medal of Honor.

See more here: http://www.cmohs.org/

 

Also from One Marine’s View

Who Are America’s Heroes?’

Posted: 18 Mar 2009 06:27 PM PDT

Tr%20MEDAL%20OF%20HONOR Airline Experience Begs Question, ‘Who Are America’s Heroes?’ 
By Donna Miles 
American Forces Press Service WASHINGTON, March 18, 2009 – The challenge issued by a flight attendant during a recent commercial air flight seemed innocuous enough: “Name just one of the fiveMedal of Honor recipients from the current engagements in Afghanistan or Iraq, and get a free drink coupon.”
But the passengers’ response – more specifically, the inability of all but just one to respond – revealed how little the average American knows about its military heroes.Bombarded by superhero lore almost from birth, many Americans grow to revere fictional heroes as well as sports and celebrity icons. But silence descended over the cabin of a flight bound from Jacksonville, Fla., to Baltimore when the conversation turned to those who had earned the nation’s highest honor for valor – even when a free cocktail hung in the balance.

Dale Shelton, an Annapolis, Md., resident who served five years as a Navy intelligence specialist, was the only passenger to press the button over his seat to beckon the attendant. Shelton’s response: Army Sgt. 1st Class Paul R. Smith, the first Medal of Honor recipient in the global war on terror and inOperation Iraqi Freedom.

Smith received the highest military honor for valor posthumously on April 3, 2005, two years to the day after saving more than 100 soldiers in the battle for Baghdad’s airport. His young son and widow accepted the award on his behalf during a solemn White House ceremony.

The flight attendant gave free drink coupons to Shelton, as well as his wife, Jean, and two other traveling companions. Then he returned to crew area to announce over the intercom that only one person had correctly answered the challenge.

This time, the attendant offered a second challenge: “Name an ‘American Idol’ winner.” The cabin lit up like a pinball machine as 43 passengers scrambled to push their attendant call button. Passengers named various Idol winners.

The attendant announced that he wasn’t going to award drink coupons for that answer, telling the passengers that “naming an Idol winner was not worth a free drink,” Shelton recalled.

“He concluded his announcement with the question: ‘What’s wrong with our country when out of 150 passengers, only one can name a Medal of Honor recipient, but 43 can name an American Idol winner?'”

Later during the flight, Shelton shared with the attendant his own frustration over “the current lack of appreciation of our military heroes.”

The attendant asked Shelton if he knew the names of the other four Medal of Honor receipts from the current military operations. Shelton said he was able to name three: Navy Lt. Michael Murphy, Navy Petty Officer 2nd Class Michael Monsoor and Army Spc. Ross McGinness. 
All were killed sacrificing themselves to protect their comrades during enemy attacks.

Murphy, a Navy SEAL, died June 28, 2005, trying to save his team members during Operation Red Wing in Afghanistan. Monsoor, also a SEAL, died in Iraq on Sept. 23, 2006, using his body to absorb a grenade blast that likely would have killed two nearby SEALs and several Iraqi soldiers. McGinnis died Dec. 4, 2006, after throwing himself on a hand grenade in Iraq to save four fellow soldiers when insurgents attacked their Humvee.

Shelton said he regretted that he had forgotten the name of Marine Cpl. Jason Dunham. Dunham died April 15, 2004, using his body to shield fellow Marines in Iraq from a hand grenade.

The flight attendant didn’t hold Shelton’s memory lapse against him. “He gave me all the remaining drink coupons he had in his possession and shook my hand,” he said.

(Editor’s note: A new special report on the Defense Department home page pays tribute to the five U.S. servicemembers who have earned the Medal of Honor for action in the war on terror.)

Recent MOH HEROES    

Posted: 19 Mar 2009 09:40 PM PDT

 

 

POTLUCK & TAKING CHANCE MOVIE SCREENING >You’re Invited!

February 20, 2009 at 3:57 pm | Posted in General Troop Support | Leave a comment
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Thanks Sherry Crenshaw Oregon CTL for this Invite! 

All PGR Members and Soldiers Angles are invited to join the American Legion Riders and other Veterans Saturday night at Smith-Renolds American Legion Post 14 for a Pot Luck Dinner and a Movie…. ( TAKING CHANCE ) The address is 4607 NE St James Rd. Van, Wa 98663 Pot Luck: 5:30 – 7:30 PM Movie: Starts at 8:00 PM Sorry this is such a short notice, but we had to slap some big wheels around to put this together.. LOL
 
The movie is about a officer that volunteers to escort a KIA marine home, for the funeral .   See article below for more information on Taking Chance 
 
Taking Chance

Taking Chance

 

Honoring Heroes-This Year’s Recipient of “Defender of Freedom Award” to an individual whose character, courage and selfless deeds inspire virtuous service from the rest of us, U.S. Marine Lieutenant Andrew Kinard”

December 26, 2008 at 10:21 pm | Posted in General Troop Support | Leave a comment
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Washington, D.C. —  Freedom Alliance is an educational-charitable foundation that, among other things, provides college scholarships to the offspring of U.S. military personnel killed in action. Every year, coincident with the Army-Navy Game, the organization presents its “Defender of Freedom Award” to an individual whose character, courage and selfless deeds inspire virtuous service from the rest of us. This year’s recipient, U.S. Marine Lieutenant Andrew Kinard unequivocally meets these criteria.

Photo, Caption Below

On October 29, 2006, Lieutenant Kinard was leading his Marines on a foot patrol in Rawah, Iraq — searching for a terrorist bomb factory — when a command-detonated IED exploded directly next to his left leg. The blast blew him into the air and he landed almost 20 feet from the crater. Three other Marines were wounded.

• Catch the ‘War Stories Classic: Prisoners of the Rising Sun,’ Mon., December 8 at 3 a.m. ET

According to those who were there, before the grievously injured officer passed out from loss of blood, he ordered them to set up security, get a head count and start treating the other injured Marines. The platoon Corpsman tried to staunch the flow of blood, but couldn’t find enough undamaged tissue to apply tourniquets and the lieutenant was losing blood — from almost everywhere.

A Cas-Evac helicopter airlifted him to the Marine Air Base at Al Asad, then to the Army trauma hospital at Balad, north of Baghdad. Sixty-seven pints of whole blood — more than five times the amount in a healthy adult — were pumped into the failing officer’s veins in a 24-hour period.

 

By the time he was flown to Landstuhl, Germany in a C-17 Nightingale, he had gone into cardiac arrest — and been resuscitated — twice. Emergency surgeries went on nearly non-stop to plug the seemingly innumerable holes punched in his body. The family was alerted and a prayer vigil held. Hundreds of people half a world away went to their knees and begged God for a miracle.

Some miracles happen immediately. This one took awhile.

Four days after being blasted to pieces, Andrew Kinard was in the intensive care unit at the National Naval Medical Center, Bethesda, Maryland, with his family around his bedside — and still praying. By the time I got back from Iraq, just before Christmas 2006, “Drew” as his Marine and Naval Academy friends call him, had already endured more than two dozen surgeries.

His doctor told me that the 24-year old lieutenant was “getting better” even though he had pneumonia, a blood infection and multiple perforations of his intestines from shrapnel. They had just done one of the many skin grafts necessary to prepare his stumps for prosthetic limbs.

When I walked into his room, his mother and his sister Katherine were with him. His dad, a doctor in Spartanburg, SC, and two younger siblings, Courtney and Will, were all enroute to spend Christmas with their badly battered Marine.

But for all the cards, poster, banners, Christmas stockings, lights, photos and flags, the room would have looked like a scene from a science fiction movie. Monitors, electronic devices, compressors, pumps and assorted tubes, wires and bags of colored fluids surrounded the bed — all the connected to Andrew Kinard. Tiny flecks of shrapnel were still visible on the side of his face. He had no legs. His abdomen was an open hole. And he was smiling. “God is good,” he said in greeting.

Over the next 11 months of hospitalization, Andrew Kinard was living proof of that statement. When I would ask him or his family, “How can I help you?” The inevitable response would be: “Just pray for recovery.” And so, he also became evidence of the power of prayer.

In April 2007, he flew to Camp Lejeune, North Carolina to meet his Marines when they returned from Iraq. Wearing his Marine utility uniform for the first time since being wounded, he greeted his comrades in a special “all-terrain” wheelchair.

Asked by a reporter to recollect the day he was wounded, he acknowledged that his memory of the attack had been dulled by shock and pain. Then he said, “A man asks himself, if something happens to me, when I go into battle, how will I react? Will I be brave?”

As they arrived home, the members of “Alpha” Company made it clear: Lieutenant Andrew Kinard was, without a doubt, their hero.

On October 29, 2007, exactly a year after he was wounded, the indomitable young officer came home. Dignitaries and thousands of well wishers were on hand to welcome Andrew at First Baptist Church, Spartanburg. The following Sunday he spoke at all three services, thanking all for their unfailing prayers.

His recovery will continue for years to come. But on one of my visits to him in the hospital the man who had once played rugby at the Naval Academy said, “I don’t need legs. I have my arms. I learned discipline at the Naval Academy. I have my faith and a desire to serve. Maybe I’ll go to law school.”

Andrew has all of that — and more. He also has a great sense of humor. He has a T-shirt with the words “Marine for Sale” printed on the front. On the back it reads: “40% Off — Some Assembly Required.”

— Oliver North hosts War Stories on FOX News Channel and is the author of the new best-seller, “American Heroes: In The War Against Radical Islam.” He has just returned from assignment in Afghanistan.

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